Plan a Life Not Just a Living

For as long as I can remember,  I know I have always wanted to be a doctor.

When I was in high school, I met  a family friend  who is an anesthesiologist. She is kind, warm, compassionate.  She attended to me when I had my first minor surgery before entering college.  She is  partly practicing and partly holding an administrative position. She was simple, pretty and elegant.

Mostly I was attracted to her demeanor. Warm, soft spoken but firm at the same time. She reassured me while going through the procedure. She seem to like what she is doing. She has a family  and spends a good amount of time with them.  I sensed a great mix of work and family life. I kept that in my mind through the years.

I want a life like that ,I told my young self.

I have kept that image  of  work life balance in my mind. Many years forward, I am a physician and had opportunities to do administrative and training work in my hospital.

Have I done it?  The balance?  I must admit not all the time.  But I found a good means to  find my way back  when it tips  off to one side.

I would like to teach you how.

Let me share  one story with you.   In one training session, I met Dr. A. She is a young fellow in her last year of training. We had an activity where they were asked to create images of their desired future.

How would life be 5 to 10 years from now?

How would each day of waking up look like?

Where am I ?

Who am I with?

What is my work place like?

How is my weekend?

Do I have a family? How are we?

Many questions. The answer to which had to be placed on a board with the most colorful and representative pictures we could find.

Then it was time to share. As she was called, I noticed she was teary eyed. The exercise was a revelation to her. Looking at her board, she saw that her ideal life was way off with the lifestyle of her chosen field. She wanted a predictable day time job that would allow her to do other things. No night calls. No emergencies.

She cried. I can sense regret and sadness.  She is on her last few days of training . Then I told her, “you know, your practice  can be as you define and design it”. She couldn’t get back the years she spent training for her field but she can practice in a way that could fit her desired ideal life.

I see her around these days. She is happy. Her practice is mostly ambulatory. She trained further in a subspecialty that makes it more of a day job. This field does not require night calls and is seldom an emergency.

Create your vision of life and work.  Keep it where you can see it. Make it a reminder to yourself each day you wake up.

.Why plan a practice when you can plan a life?

What’s your plan? Share yours.

Photo by Free Photos.cc from Pexels https://www.pexels.com/photo/coffee-creative-notebook-office-64769/

Managing the Wait

ID-10087781

One very rainy day, I went to the grocery. I had to stock up because Mr. Weatherman said its going to be a wet and stormy week and my pantry is empty. As soon as I stepped into the grocery, I realized I was not the only one thinking that way. So with EVERYBODY else!! It looked like panic buying! The next hurdle was getting to the counters to pay! The lines were long and slow 🙁

Waiting is not fun. I admire establishments who are able to manage waiting lines. I have a few good experience waiting.

I stayed in a hotel for a convention. During such time, rooms are filled up with delegates. Breakfast time will find you lining up to get in. Long, long line. My stomach is already grumbling. Out came the manager carrying mini sandwiches and offering drinks to those in line! I couldn’t help but smile.

I accompanied my aunt for an eye check up in a busy eye center. This center is known for its good doctors and good service. I was expecting a long wait. I went directly to the receptionist who got her name and gave me a form I helped my aunt to fill up. I gave the form back and we sat in a waiting area. After a few minutes, another person approached us and asked my aunt a few questions then he excused himself and told us to wait and he will get back to my aunt. He came back and led us to another area where my aunt’s eye was briefly examined using a machine. Then back to a sitting area where we waited. Not too many minutes after, we were asked to move to another area and enter a consultation room. We waited for a while again. My aunt was seen by an eye doctor who discussed her condition and medications. Another person came to lead us to the next area where we were asked if we want the prescriptions filled or we would like to proceed to payment. We paid and off we went. I am sure there was a line. But we moved from one station to another with a manageable wait in between stations. There was always someone attending to us. There was something being done to my aunt in between waits. It felt like we were progressing. The waiting became manageable.

Paying bills can also involve long waits. Stores have made use of numbers for queiung. You get the number. Find out what number is currently being served either by asking or through the dashboard displayed. You still wait but knowing your order in the line eases the waiting because your mind has been prepared to accept it. You can choose to do other things or come back at an approximate time. For those who chooses to wait, a television plays a video or show to keep you entertained.

Fast food needs to be fast! With several persons ahead of me before i get to the counter to order, the store manager starts to take orders from people in the line and calls the order in advance to the kitchen staff. I still have to wait but knowing its getting prepared and all I had to do in the counter is pay made waiting okay.

We can learn from these experiences to manage waiting time of patients in our clinic.

1. Make waiting bearable. Offer something to ease the wait. Something to eat or drink. Something children can do like coloring books or book to browse for children and parents or toys children can play with.

2. Give patients a sense that their visit is progressing. For pediatricians, it can start with getting measurements.If you have a nurse or an associate, have them conduct preliminary interview before they enter the consultation room. If there is fever, paracetamol can be given. If the presenting problem is known, for example diarrhea or fever, materials to read can be given for parents to read. Just like my eye center experience, the wait seem shorter.

3. If patients need to wait because you will not make it to the clinic on time, inform them of the approximate time of arrival. Under promise, over deliver.

There will be ocassions when waiting is inevitable. Managing it makes it acceptable. How is your patient waiting?

photo credit: Vlado/freedigitalphotos.net

How to Apply for HMO Accreditation

ID-100291271

Health Maintenance Organizations remain to be one of the major means patients access health care. As a service provider, you
can apply to be affiliated with HMO as long as you agree with their terms and conditions including fees and payment schedule.

If you are in a multispecialty clinic who accepts HMO, the arrangement is made by the clinic so you can accept patients who will use their HMO.

If you have a clinic of your own, you can apply and course it through their offices or clinics located in hospitals where you are affiliated.

I asked different HMOs about their application procedures. Requirements for most are similar which may include:

Letter of intent
Medical school diploma
Medical Board certificate
Specialty or subspecialty board certificate
Copy of PRC card, PTR (professional tax receipt),
Official receipt, TIN, VAT registration, Philhealth registration as a health provider

The HMO sends you a contract which stipulates the terms of your engagement,fees, payment,and documentation. The contract can be for inpatient or outpatient or both. Once approved, patients who wants to avail of your services will be given a form by the HMO each time they make an outpatient consult. This is the form you will fill up and include in your documentation so the HMO can pay your fees. For in patient, hospitals are given a list of accredited doctors. If you are in the list, patients can be admitted under your service using their HMO. Payment for your fees may range from 1 to 6 months.

photo credit: Stuart Miles/freedigitalphotos.net